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2021 Weekly Benefit Amount Updates

By February 1, 2021April 16th, 2021Newsletter

You may wonder how much a person can collect while on unemployment. That is up to each individual state. Every state has its own computation method as well as minimum and maximum caps on the amount that can be collected each week. Most states allow claimants to collect up to 26 total weeks of benefits within a 52-week benefit year. Due to the pandemic, some states may temporarily provide additional benefits.

2021 Unemployment WBA Tax Rate and Wage Base Information shows the latest changes to weekly benefit amounts by state. All changes to earlier figures are highlighted in yellow.

  • Minimum Weekly Benefit Amount – The lowest amount of unemployment compensation the claimant may collect on a weekly basis.
  • Maximum Weekly Benefit Amount – The highest amount of unemployment compensation the claimant may collect on a weekly basis.

As is common in January, not all states have issued their minimum and maximum tax rates for the year. This is especially true for 2021 as states grapple with how to address the effects of the pandemic on employers and their trust funds.

As a reimbursing employer, your organization’s State Unemployment Insurance Tax Rate is 0%. Your organization pays quarterly deposits into a reserve account with the Trust. We handle all your unemployment claims, on your behalf, directly with the state. After the state pays benefit charges to the claimant, they send the bill to 501(c) Agencies Trust for payment. We repay the state for the benefit charges, from your reserve account. This method of repaying the state is called: reimbursement method and is in lieu of paying the state unemployment tax (SUI).

Because you are a reimbursing employer with a SUI rate of 0%, please disregard the columns:

  • Taxable Wage Base – The amount of wages an employer is taxed on for each employee.
  • Minimum Tax Rate – The lowest tax rate a state can issue to an employer.
  • Maximum Tax Rate – The highest rate a state can issue to an employer.

These updates are brought to you by our friends at EWS.

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